ArtHaus Custom Picture Framing

Celebrating, Preserving & Restoring Life's Treasured Moments

Handcrafted frames for your precious art and memories & photo restoration

eGift Cards

We look forward to reopening and when we do you can use your gift card that you can purchase today.

We use the finest pine, finger joined, stretcher bars

We do not use low quality wood that can warp in a few months or years. We will not sell any stretching material than can not stand the test of time. We carefully stretch canvas art and giclees to be straight on the bars. Stretcher bar thickness are available in 0.5, 0.75, 1 , 1.5 and 2 inches.
  • ★★★★★
    I’ve gotten multiple things framed here and it’s always been a great experience. The owners are very helpful and knowledgeable and the work is top notch! This is my go-to framing place.

    Malik Elizee

  • ★★★★★
    My art piece was transformed for my new house by the clever new matting and framing

    Cheryl Bernstein

  • ★★★★★
    I am so happy that I found this service, Troy has saved my grandparents wedding photo!

    Karie Scuiller

  • ★★★★★
    This is the place to go for custom framing. Fast, courteous, and talented!

    Amanda Feil

  • ★★★★★
    …the pricing to have my canvas oil painting stretched and gallery wrapped was significantly less than even other “discount” framing stores. Service was outstanding. I would definitely recommend.

    CustomR.Jeffrey Burgfechteler #2

  • ★★★★★
    If you’re seeking a photo restorer for your priceless family history photos look no further.  ArtHaus Framing restored four of my photos, all of them over 100 years old to absolute perfection.

    Jonathan R.

  • ★★★★★
    I’m really thrilled with the work ArtHaus did on a historic photo for me. A nearly 100-year-old photo of my grandfather was falling to pieces and had fallen out of its equally old frame. ArtHaus scanned and digitally restored the photo, reprinted it and reframed in my original frame. I can’t wait to give it to my mom for Christmas!!

    Shanna H.

  • ★★★★★
    Thank you for the great ideas on how to frame the pictures!

    Cathryn Carlson

  • ★★★★★
    Got a beautiful pattachitra painting on paper of Radhey akrushan framed here. Beautifully done and lovingly handled. Would highly recommend the place.

    Mridula Pandey

  • ★★★★★
    I have brought 2 art prints to Troy and both times he has helped tremendously in determining the best frame and mat option. I will happily be bringing future prints to Arthaus for my custom framing needs.

    Ross Freehling

  • ★★★★★
    Great local shop – variety of selection of frames and the owner is awesome. He was friendly, down-to-earth, and very helpful.

    Kathy Lin

We look forward to reopening and when we do you can use your gift card that you can purchase today.

We provide two types of canvas stretching, gallery and studio wrap.

Gallery Wrap

This is a technique of stretching and mounting a canvas over thick wooden bars creating a sense of depth in the painting. The Gallery Wrap doesn’t have any visible staples or nails holding the canvas to the wooden stretcher.

There are two options with Gallery Wrap:

  1. Continuous Wrap – The painting is literally wrapped over the edges of the thick wooden bars creating a sense of depth to the painting

  2. Border Color – The edges can be painted with another color, either a color that continues the edges of the painting itself, or a standard color to give the painting a sense of border

For gallery wrap canvases, we recommend using 1″ , 1 1/2″ and 2″ thick stretcher bars in order to make them strong enough to hang unframed without warping. No staples are visible.

Studio Wrap


The purpose of studio wrap stretching is to prepare the canvas for framing. This is the most common way of stretching canvas. The staples are on the side of the stretcher bar and visible.

For studio wrap, we recommend using a 3/4  or 5/8 inch thick stretcher bar.

How we Gallery Wrap small canvas panels

Float Frame For Gallery Wraps

What is a Floater or Float frame? A floater frame is a minimalist frame option sometimes used when framing art on canvas. The painting drops into the front of the frame so none of its front surface is covered. This is especially beneficial when the painting continues from the front down the sides of the canvas or when an important part of the subject comes so close to the edge of the art that it would be covered with the lip of a standard frame. As most float frames are very simple profiles, another, more decorative, frame can be added around it to being out the personality of your art.

FAQ

We prefer to have at least 1″ beyond the amount of canvas it takes to cover the edge of the stretcher bar. That way, we have something to grab with the canvas pliers so that we can stretch the canvas tightly with a minimum of wrinkles. This means we prefer 2-3″ from the edge of the painting. In that way, we can staple the canvas on the back. If you are stretching on a 1 1/2″ to 2″ deep Gallery Wrap stretcher, you will need an extra 2 1/2″ to 3″ all around.

There is no problem with the canvas being rolled up. Hopefully, however, the paint was not applied so thickly that it didn’t crack in the process. The most common problem we run into with canvases from South America, Central America, Africa and the Caribbean, is that they were painted on stretchers that were not square to start with, on canvas that may be something as inexpensive as bed sheets, curtains or spare fabric that have been coated with gesso. In addition to not being square, they may not have left you much on the edges to re-stretch the canvas. 

The largest canvas we can stretch is 8 x 8 feet long.  Keep in mind that there may be logistical issues with a canvas that size, such as getting it through a doorway and transporting it. A truck with a big box on the back  is usually required to transport a stretched canvas of that size. 

You can, but the issue is that stretcher bars are specifically shaped, so that the canvas only rests on the rounded outer edge, with the main, flat portion falling away and tapering in thickness so that the stretcher doesn’t touch the back of the canvas. Over time, if it does touch it, a line begins to appear in the painting. 

Canvas Stretching Gallery